Firetalk — Enterprise Plan

We are excited to introduce Firetalk’s Enterprise Plan. The Enterprise Plan is designed for larger entities looking for large scale, personalized service. Please contact info@firetalk.com for a quote and more information.

Enterprise Plan Features:

  • Unlimited Broadcasting — The Enterprise Plan features unlimited broadcasting (no monthly time limit).
  • Unlimited Concurrent Viewers — Enterprise broadcasts can support unlimited concurrent viewers in a stream.
  • 3 Guests — The Enterprise Plan supports 3 Guests and the host (four simultaneous on-screen streams).
  • Episode Archiving — The Enterprise Plan supports archiving, both for channel episode recordings and event replays.
  • Screen Sharing — The Enterprise Plan supports screen sharing via the Firetalk Screen Sharing extension (Chrome and Firefox).
  • Tip Jar — The Enterprise Plan allows a host to receive direct and supplemental support from viewers via the Tip Jar.
  • Free or Paid Events — All paid plan users (including Enterprise Plan) may schedule free or paid events, with a minimum ticket price of $1.00US for paid events.
  • *HD Encoder Feeds — The Enterprise Plan can support high definition software or hardware encoder feeds.
  • *Producer Feature — The Enterprise Plan offers producer capability for channel broadcasts.
  • *Embedding — The Enterprise Plan offers embedding capability for streams.

*Starred features are unique to the Enterprise Plan

Upgrade your Firetalk plan by visiting your channel settings and scrolling down to the section titled “Premium Options.” For assistance or questions, please visit our Help Center.

Firetalk — Semi-Pro Plan

We are excited to introduce Firetalk’s Semi-Pro Plan for $49/month.

Please direct all questions and special access requests to our Zendesk Help Center.

Semi-Pro Features:

  • 100 Hours/Month — All Semi-Pro Plan users can broadcast for up to 100 hours each month.
  • 150 Concurrent Viewers — Semi-Pro broadcasts can host up to 150 concurrent viewers per stream. If there are already 150 viewers on a stream, other viewers must wait until a viewer who is already watching drops off the stream.
  • 3 Guests — Semi-Pro supports 3 Guests and the host (four simultaneous on-screen streams).
  • Episode Archiving — Semi-Pro supports archiving, both for channel episode recordings and event replays.
  • Screen Sharing — Semi-Pro broadcasting supports screen sharing via the Firetalk Screen Sharing extension (Chrome and Firefox).
  • Tip Jar — The Semi-Pro Plan allows a host to receive direct and supplemental support from viewers via the Tip Jar.
  • Free or Paid Events — All paid plan users (including Semi-Pro Plan) may schedule free or paid events, with a minimum ticket price of $1.00US for paid events.

Upgrade your Firetalk plan by visiting your channel settings and scrolling down to the section titled “Premium Options.” For assistance or questions, please visit our Help Center.

Firetalk — Basic Plan

We are excited to introduce Firetalk’s Basic Plan for $15/month.

Please direct all questions and special access requests to our Zendesk Help Center.

Basic Plan Features:

  • 25 Hours/Month — All Basic Plan users can broadcast for up to 25 hours each month.
  • 50 Concurrent Viewers — Basic Plan broadcasts can host up to 50 concurrent viewers per stream. If there are already 50 viewers on a stream, other viewers must wait until a viewer who is already watching drops off the stream.
  • 2 Guests — Basic Plan supports 2 Guests and the host (three simultaneous on-screen streams).
  • Episode Archiving — Basic Plan supports archiving, both for channel episode recordings and event replays.
  • Screen Sharing — Basic Plan broadcasting supports screen sharing via the Firetalk Screen Sharing extension (Chrome and Firefox).
  • Tip Jar — The Basic Plan allows a host to receive direct and supplemental support from viewers via the Tip Jar.
  • Free or Paid Events — All paid plan users (including Basic Plan) may schedule free or paid events, with a minimum ticket price of $1.00US for paid events.

Upgrade your Firetalk plan by visiting your channel settings and scrolling down to the section titled “Premium Options.” For assistance or questions, please visit our Help Center.

HD Encoding to Firetalk FAQ

Firetalk offers a simple, easy-to-use Web based interface for broadcasting with Chrome, Firefox, or other modern Web browsers. This is a great way to get started if you want to start broadcasting in just a few clicks. However, Web browsers do have their limitations, and a popular option for advanced broadcasting is to use an “encoder”. This guide will walk you through the basic process of streaming with an encoder through Firetalk as well as provide some recommendations for inexpensive encoding options.

Please be aware that, as a live streaming site, we do not support channels that push prerecorded content in a live format via encoder. Such channels may need to be removed. Firetalk supports encoding for Events only.

An encoder may be either a software app you install on your computer or a hardware device. Hardware options provide the best quality and may be a good choice for “in the field” use, but they’re also more expensive.  Software encoders work in a similar way, but require a computer hooked up to a video source, such as a Webcam or video capture device.

Firetalk supports any software or hardware encoder that supports “RTMP Live Streaming.” In this tutorial we will describe some generic use cases for both hardware and software solutions and provide a specific example using the Open Source “OBS” (Open Broadcast Software) application, because it’s free and easy to use but still has some powerful features.

 RTMP (Real-Time Macromedia Protocol) Streaming

Adobe wrote the specification for RTMP and it is a widely used standard for sending and receiving real-time and on-demand video content that has been encoded.  Basically, once you have chosen either a software or hardware live streaming solution that supports RTMP servers, the following information is common and required by all, but may vary slightly by terminology or naming conventions.  This information can be found on the event flyer page for any scheduled event you own:

Field Name Definition
RTMP Server or FMS (Flash Media Server) URL The fully qualified URL and path to the destination streaming server.  In this case, Firetalk’s stream server (e.g. rtmp://rtmp.firetalk.com:1935/encoder).  Because this is not web content the url always starts with “rtmp://.  “
Stream Key This is a unique identifier for authentication to the RTMP server.  Without it, or with any typos, this will fail.
Playback URL (optional) URL used by applications that can preview the streaming video outside of Firetalk and can perform on the fly editing/clipping of live material.

Find your Encoder URL and Stream Key on your event’s flyer page. Again, these fields often have different names depending on your solution.

Software and Hardware Encoders:

Software

Hardware

Firetalk will work with all mainstream encoders and broadcast-quality gear used in TV Production (Tricaster, Harmonics, Elemental, Digital Rapids, Cisco, etc).  Here are a few inexpensive options we have found to be excellent for remote in-venue productions:

Installation Examples

OBS (Open Broadcast Software) Example:

Installing OBS

If you have not already downloaded OBS, head over to the OBS Download Page to get the latest installer for OBS for your platform. (OBS is available for Windows, Mac, and Linux.)

Download the installation package, and extract and run it as you would any other app.

Configuring OBS

Before you can start an encoder-based broadcast, you need to get your connection details and “stream key”. These details are unique to your event — never share them with anybody!

Your Firetalk encoding settings can be found on your event flyer page.  It will including the necessary RTMP input parameters, similar to this:

 

Field Name Definition
Firetalk RTMP Server URL rtmp://rtmp.firetalk.com/encoder
Stream Key my-channel?streamKey=12345678
Playback URL (optional) rtmp://rtmp.firetalk.com/encoder/ my-channel

Copy these values exactly – yours will be different, obviously!

Now start OBS. Click Settings either in the lower-right corner of the app or in the top menu, and go to the Stream section. Select Custom Streaming Server, and paste in the values provide by the Firetalk settings info above:

screen-shot-2015-10-30-at-3-14-45-pm

OBS has default settings that are a good start for most streaming needs. However, if you have the Internet bandwidth to push higher quality streams (or your bandwidth is limited, and want to REDUCE your quality settings to provide a more reliable feed), you can customize these options in the other Settings tabs (Output, Video, Advanced, etc.)

A list of the recommended settings is provided at the end of this document. Note that increasing settings does not automatically increase quality, and can even decrease it in some cases. For example, pushing a bitrate higher than 3-5Mbps can make it difficult for your viewers to “keep up,” even if you yourself have enough bandwidth to do that. The same is true for resolution – higher resolutions require more “work” and bandwidth for your viewers to watch.

Cerevo LiveShell Pro/LiveShell2 Example:

Before you can start an encoder-based broadcast, you need to get your connection details and “stream key”. These details are unique to your event — never share them with anybody!

Your Firetalk encoding settings can be found on your event flyer or event player after you have scheduled an event.  It will including the necessary RTMP input parameters, similar to this:

Field Name Definition
Firetalk RTMP Server URL rtmp://rtmp.firetalk.com/encoder
Stream Key my-channel?streamKey=12345678
Playback URL (optional) rtmp://rtmp.firetalk.com/encoder/ my-channel

Copy these values exactly – yours will be different, obviously!

After following the setup and install for your Cerevo encoder, you should have a web page similar to the one below.  SELECT “Settings” in the upper right of screen.

cerevo1

It will open the settings window. Under the “Streaming Settings” Tab click “Edit” and paste in the values provide by the Firetalk settings info as above.

cerevo2

Click “Save and set as default”

You can customize your stream settings by clicking on the “Custom” button (see recommendations below)

cerevo3

Plug in the desired values for quality using the recommendations

cerevo4

When ready, Click “START LIVE” – your event will come to life!

firetalk1firetalk2

 

In general, the recommendations listed below will provide a good experience for 80% of broadcasters and viewers. If you tune them, make “small” changes to only one setting at a time, and test to see how it impacts the quality of your stream.

Firetalk Recommended Stream Settings:

Recommended Stream Settings
Setting Value Comments
Video Bitrate 1000

5000
The default of 2500 should work well for most broadcasters. Use higher values (up to 5000) for high-def streaming and lower values (down to 1000) if bandwidth is a problem.
Audio Bitrate 160 Reducing this to 128 will save a small amount of bandwidth – but not much, and the quality loss may be noticeable. Do not set this value above 160, or viewers on iOS devices will have trouble viewing your streams.
Audio Sample Rate 44100

48000
441000 works well in almost all settings, and the quality difference at 48000 is almost never noticeable unless you are providing a high-quality music stream from a direct audio source.
Video Resolution 640×360
960×540
1280×720
1920×1080
Firetalk supports the four most common 16:9 video resolutions: 360p, 540p, 720p, and 1080p. Higher resolutions will increase stream quality but at the cost of higher bandwidth usage. If you stream at a higher resolution, you should also increase your video bitrate. In general, lower resolutions at higher bitrates look better than higher resolutions at lower bitrates.
Frames Per Second (FPS) 24 Supported values include 15, 24, 29.97, and 30. The recommended value is 24. This value affects bandwidth usage, with higher values requiring more bandwidth. Higher values may produce higher quality feeds, but will also introduce more “delay” for broadcast viewers.
Use Constant Bitrate Enabled A constant bitrate feed will allow broadcast variants to be produced more reliably. Variable bitrates and variable framerates may create significant time delays in your feeds, dropped frames, “glitches”, and other problems.